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Children's Aid Society of Algoma
Become a Foster Parent

 

What is Foster Care?
Foster parents are concerned people in the community who want to help provide a safe, nurturing place for children who cannot live in their own home.
Foster parents can provide short-term care to a child for a day or two, or they can help a child develop towards adulthood by providing long-term foster care. The arrangements are determined by the child’s needs and the availability of the foster parents.
 
Foster parents are always needed in the Algoma region. Currently there are 169* children in care and only 101*foster homes to look after them. (*As of May 2013)
 
The Truth about Fostering
The truth about fostering is that foster parents come from all walks of life with a variety of ethnic and cultural backgrounds. They act as role models, teachers, and nurturers and provide a stable caring home for children. Foster parents may be:
 
- Male or female
- Married or single
- Be 25 years of age or older
- Have children that are grown or still in the home
 
Support Systems
- A Foster Care Coordinator for individual support
- A tax-free reimbursement for the child’s living expenses
- Initial orientation and on-going training
- Access to other therapeutic services a child may require
 
Ways to Help:
- Respite
- Relief
- Emergency
- Short or long term care to a child
 
Who are the children?
Each child is unique and has different strengths and interests. Every child shares one common thread; the need for love and acceptance.
 
Children range in age from infancy to 16 and come from all ethnic backgrounds.
 
 
Genawenman Binojiuk (Foster Care) Program
 
 
Nog-da-win-da-min Family and Community Services, a child welfare prevention agency serving seven First Nations between Sault Ste. Marie and Sudbury, Ontario, is fully licensed to approve foster homes on and off reserve. Nog-da-win-da-min is able to open provisional, regular, emergency and relief foster homes.
 
If you are an Anishnabek family interested in fostering Anishnabek children and youth, go to www.nog.ca